YAP Proposal #104: Community Based food security (Keghah Roger Nuah, Cameroon)

SAM_2499

Information about the applicant

I am a Cameroonian, born on the 08/08/1979 in Banso-Bui Division of the North West Region. I am a trainer in sustainable agriculture. I empower farmers by training and teaching best farming practices for sustainable growing while building business and commerce in the region. My purpose is to develop farming systems that are productive, profitable, conserve energy, are environmentally sound, create healthy mineral packed produce, conserve natural resources, which that ensure food safety and quality.

I am proposing and teaching ways to improve harvest yields, crop quality, and plant uniformity. Additionally I am working to save water, reduce fertilizer and pesticide use, and improve the livelihood of farmers and their farms. I do carry out research on the impacts of climate change on community members targeting farmers, students, women as well as community youth groups; including indigenous people especially the Mbororo Fulani Pastoralist. I promote the creation of community and school environmental clubs to sensitize people on the impacts of climate change. I also distribute and plant trees in school compounds and government and private structures and organizations.

I train farmers on land conservation techniques including agro-forestry, organic farming, alliance farming and pasture improvement

Project description

The overall food security situation in Cameroon has sharply deteriorated in 2015 due to multiple shocks, including the influx of refugees from the CAR and Nigeria, increasing civil insecurity and natural hazards. In September 2015, the number of food insecure people was estimated at 1.27 million, 18 percent up from January 2015 and more than three times higher than two years earlier. An estimated 75 percent of IDPs have engaged in “crisis” and “urgency” strategies such as the reduction of non-food essential expenses, sale of productive assets and begging

Irregular and poor rainfall in recent years has led to a reduction of 40 percent of planted areas in Cameroon. Land degradation in advanced stages is occurring across many areas of Cameroon. Food insecurity is chronic in the Sudano-Sahelian zone as well as in the Western zone, a phenomenon closely intertwined with unsustainable utilization of the land. Young farmers in Cameroon and Bamenda city in particular are seeking ways to improve their harvest yields, crop quality, and plant uniformity. Additionally they seek to save water, reduce fertilizer and pesticide use, and improve their largest investment, their family and farm.

Community based food security project has as its goal to empower farmers by training and teaching best farming practices for sustainable growing while building business and commerce in the region. It aims to promote sustainable economic growth in undeveloped areas based on reconciling the strategic objectives of wealth creation, food security, and fight against unemployment, improving living conditions of population.

The purpose of this project is to develop farming systems that are productive, profitable, conserve energy, are environmentally sound, create healthy mineral packed produce, conserve natural resources, which that ensure food safety and quality. I seek to build sustainable soils, commerce, and trade with woman farmers while creating business opportunities and jobs to the female residents of the country and region. Using this model to enhance the lives of women and empowering them to create food, income, credit and a business.

agroforestry workshop.03

Activities

Activity 1.1: create, organize and re-structure youth farming groups in Bamenda city. 40 youth common initiative/farming groups are identified and transformed into at least 4 legalized cooperatives.

Activity 1.2: Sensitization on extreme weather patterns and climate variability, increasing temperatures, food insecurity in youth common initiative groups/farming groups. At least 3,000 (1,000 of women, 1,000 of men, 500 of boys, 500 of girls) attend sensitizations on knowing how to adapt and mitigate climate change. At least 20 sensitization sessions are held in youth common initiative/farming groups.1, 000 rich pictures (posters) are produced and distributed. 01 radio program is created known as Climate Hour and runs twice a month.

Activity 1.3: Train climate monitors.01 (02days) workshop is organized for 40climate monitors on interpretation of climate forecast and collection of local data on weather patterns.

Activity 1.4: Putting in place climate centers.02 climate Centers (01 per sub division) is created. These centers will access climate forecast information and disseminate them through short mobile phone text messages to youth farming group leaders for dissemination to group members, broadcast it through local radio stations during climate hour. Traditional and scientific climate forecast will be discussed and actions promoted. At least 3000farmers receive short mobile phone text messages

Activity 1.5: Demonstration plot on drought tolerant crop varieties.02 demonstration plot on drought tolerant legumes and cereals will be established in each of the subdivision. Local and improved seed varieties available in the markets will be research on and high yielding varieties will be propagated for youth farmers. Based on the research youth farmers will make a choice on with variety to plant to increase yields and farm incomes. The goal is to compare the performance of the crop varieties for small holder farmers’ adaptability in the face of climate change.Experimental Design A 2 x 3 x 3 factorial experiment will be carried out using a Split plot Design arranged in a Completely Randomized Block Design (CRBD) with 3 blocks and 3 replications per subplot (treatment). Research question which crop varieties are suitable for youth farmers facing climate change?

Activity 1.6: Workshop for youth farming groups on market gardening. 40Youth farming group leaders with the ability to understand and transfer knowledge to peers in a simple manner from Bamenda city will be identified and invited to take part in 03days training on market gardening. These youth farming group leaders will be trained on building soils especially compost production, garden establishment and management, integrated pest management and market research for the distribution of their products

Activity 1.7: Establishment of youth group gardens. At least 05 youth group gardens are established. Each youth group garden constitute 1/4hectare made up of vegetables such as huckkle berry, carrots, persie, celerie, carrbages, tomatoes, green beans.

Project Budget: $5000

Activity Amount in $
Identification of group 100
Sensitization on climate change 200
Demonstration 1500
Trainings 1500
Establishment of gardens 1700
Total 5000

Time frame : April 2016 to March 2017

Blogpost and picture submitted by Keghah Roger Nuah (Cameroon) – keghahroger[at]rocketmail.com

The content, structure and grammar is at the discretion of the author only.


This post is published as proposal #104 of “YAP” – our “Youth Agripreneur Project”.

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22 thoughts on “YAP Proposal #104: Community Based food security (Keghah Roger Nuah, Cameroon)

  1. this is a good project that deals with all the sectors of the community (it is gender balanced).
    It is aimed at using an integrated and ecosystem based approach.
    It is also aimed at bringing information closer to the farmers especially climate information

  2. Great initiative to promote healthy environment and healthy living amongst the inhabitants in the north-west region, cameroon

  3. Keghah is a professional in his field and having worked with him and his organisation (CAEPA Cameroon), his work is changing lives for the better one project at a time! You have my support!

  4. Roger Go Ahead. It is ambitious but achievable.You can help the people and country. Blessings and good wishes

  5. This indeed is an amazing project. It not only disseminates climate change information, but also creates awareness by providing climate change information to these affected communities, and even goes further to build capacity. It is an inspiring and encouraging project, leading the way for other communities to embark on similar works. Do not tire in impacting peoples lives and making their world a better place to be

  6. This is an encouraging and inspiring.. Keep on working to improving the livelihood and build capacity of affected communities.. Keep it up. Do not tire of making the lives of affected people a better place to be

  7. The project idea is very nice. I hope this will make an impact on the livelihood of the target group to improve their food security.Keep up your goood efforts.

  8. Your project conceptualisation is very nice. I hope it will make a good impact on improving the food security of the target group. Kee up your efforts and energetic work to bring changes in the livelihood of the target community. Wish you all the success. JAI SRI

  9. Keghah Rogers is a leader and should be embraced with the loving arms of our organic community as a man on a mission for true change for the better

    Keghah Rogers is blazing a trail for organic and sustainable agriculture in Cameroon. For many years I have watched a boy turn into a man with single mindedness to learn organic/sustainable growing methods so he can later teach and share information to the people of Cameroon. He has learned many methods of organic growing and sutanaible crop management with great success.
    Heart and soul is poured over his beloved Cameroon and the people to create true sustainable farming methods that will ensure future generations food security. It is not only about farming with Keghah its about building sustainable soils that are rich in yielding highly dense mineral packed produce for optimal health of the people of Cameroon. His education is rounded from teaching women farmers from seed to harvest and also teaching commerce and selling produce so money and business can stay within their community. He has a heart for orphans, widows and people inflicted with HIV and AIDS this where he has introduce the moringa farm that initiate a true power food so the sick old and young, pregnant mothers nursing their babies will have adequate nutrition and vitamins produced from moringa and highly dense mineral packed vegetables grown with biological organic soils.

    Keghah is making a true difference and I commend his efforts endorse his willingness to make a difference in organic and sustainable farming practices

    Truly,

    Dori Bon

    Dori Bon LLC
    Thoron Environmental Services LLC
    Grow For Change 501c3
    International Crop Adviser And Organic Agriculture Specialist

  10. Keghah Rogers is a leader and should be embraced with the loving arms of our organic community as a man on a mission for true change for the better

    Keghah Rogers is blazing a trail for organic and sustainable agriculture in Cameroon. For many years I have watched a boy turn into a man with single mindedness to learn organic/sustainable growing methods so he can later teach and share information to the people of Cameroon. He has learned many methods of organic growing and sutanaible crop management with great success.
    Heart and soul is poured over his beloved Cameroon and the people to create true sustainable farming methods that will ensure future generations food security. It is not only about farming with Keghah its about building sustainable soils that are rich in yielding highly dense mineral packed produce for optimal health of the people of Cameroon. His education is rounded from teaching women farmers from seed to harvest and also teaching commerce and selling produce so money and business can stay within their community. He has a heart for orphans, widows and people inflicted with HIV and AIDS this where he has introduce the moringa farm that initiate a true power food so the sick old and young, pregnant mothers nursing their babies will have adequate nutrition and vitamins produced from moringa and highly dense mineral packed vegetables grown with biological organic soils.

    Keghah is making a true difference and I commend his efforts endorse his willingness to make a difference in organic and sustainable farming practices

    Truly,

    Dori Bon

    Dori Bon LLC
    Thoron Environmental Services LLC
    Grow For Change 501c3
    International Crop Adviser And Organic Agriculture Specialist

  11. Hi Kehgah. You’re efforts and accomplishments are inspirational. That being said, I wish I could be there with you.

    Considering the large population that is at risk in your area, it seems that a volume crop known for sustaining life during famine, might be a good idea. Has your team worked with potatoes yet? I know that they grow well in desert environments.

    Water and nutrients are the keys. Here in the US we have very successful record of farming in large volumes, in dessert environments. One of the most common crop is potato.

    It’s a bit harder to remain totally organic with such large volume crops, but the trade off is that you can feed millions. Circle farming, with 1/4 mile long irrigation “arms” extending from a central well create a half mile circle as they move in a circular pattern. This requires several wells to be strategically placed (see image below). Another method is the more traditional row farming, as seen in the other picture…but it too requires irrigation, for which there are a number of solutions.

    Managing “blight” is something you’ll have to be rigorous about. and if the soils are too infertile, you will have to supplement them. This can be done to very tight tolerances, so that the fertilizer used does not create excess or runoff.

    In any case, these thoughts are on large scale farming for feeding very large populations that might be at risk. If this is not the reality of your area, then you have many alternative options at your disposal.

    Whatever path you choose, it will be far better than doing nothing. I only wish that many more like you would step forward and work together in a coordinated effort. If this were to happen, suspect that global hunger would become an endangered species. 🙂

  12. Roger this is fascinating. the ideas are in line with the Alliance for Food Sovereignty in Africa. maybe you can contact them and become a member. the alliance has produced 10 best case studies on agro-ecology with similar concepts as in your project. One of which is on agro-biodiversity and from Zimbabwe. The link to their website is http://www.afsafrica.org/case-studies. Using the farmer field school concepts would enhance the research output as it is more participatory. Otherwise this is good piece of work

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